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2012, Bulgaria, deportations, discrimination, education, employment, France, Romania

‘Is Hollande Going to Expel Us All’? Roma Population in France Faces Discrimination and an Uncertain Future | Alternet

Excerpt:

“The Roma families who live in the Voltaire settlement in Saint-Denis, near Paris, count themselves lucky. They live on a piece of land owned by the State, they have houses – modest prefab affairs that they built themselves, using materials put at their disposal by a philantropic entrepreneur – and their children go to school.

It’s early September, la rentrée , and I’m following the steps of Adriana, a 30 year-old charity worker, who’s going from house to house to help parents fill up school forms in French (the ones that say who to call in case of emergency, and whether you want your kid to have school meals). Adriana makes sure parents understand how parent-teacher books work, and I am reminded of my own childhood: a mother holds a notebook covered in yellow plastic, and nods intently to explanations given in Romanian. Here, school is taken seriously too.

In Romania, Adriana, who studied psychology, used to work in a bank. She moved to France three years ago and now acts as a mediator between the 200 Roma people who live in this settlement and the council (which finances her job). As all Romanians, she is free to visit France but, in theory, not allowed to stay for longer than 3 months. She’s been fighting to obtain the right to live in France, with the help of Rues et Cités, the charity that employs her. “I didn’t know much about Roma culture before,” she says. “I discovered they have values I can identify with.” She confirms school is important to parents and their children. “In this settlement, there’s a 13 year-old girl who was born in France. She’s always been to school here. When kids have been going to school in France for a few years, there’s never any problems with them. We don’t receive reports from the schools signaling that they have been called this or that by their schoolmates – which can happen when they’re only starting and don’t speak French.” Prejudice, she thinks, is largely fuelled by the French media. “If you were to believe them, you’d think there were 100 000 Roma people in France. As it happens, there’s only 15 000 of them.” Adriana was  hoping that after Hollande election “people would stop talking about ‘Roma’, and only talk about ‘Romanians’ or ‘Bulgarians’, that the ethnicisation would be abandoned.” But it hasn’t. “I suppose headlines about Roma sell well,” she says, shrugging.”

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via ‘Is Hollande Going to Expel Us All’? Roma Population in France Faces Discrimination and an Uncertain Future | Alternet.

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